New monument discovered on the World Heritage Site of Petra, Jordan

New monument discovered on the World Heritage Site of Petra, Jordan

Site of Petra, Jordan

Jordan: A large and undiscovered monument have been found near the world renowned archaeological site of Petra in Jordan, it was buried under the sands.

 

The American Schools of Oriental Research published a study which says that with the help of ground surveys, drone photography and satellite images archaeologists located the monument.

 

This monument looks like a platform and it is almost as long as an Olympic swimming pool and more than double in its width. It is not like any other structure found at the historic site.

 

The research has been done by Sarah Parcak of the University of Alabama, Birmingham and Christopher Tuttle who is the executive director of the Council of American Overseas Research Centers.

 

The pottery at the surface of the structure suggests that it was constructed at the time of Petra’s peak in the mid-second century B.C. Petra was founded by the Nabataean people in the fourth century B.C, they were spread in the regions of Jordan, Iraq, Lebanon and Syria.

 

In an interview to National Geographic Mr.Tuttle said, “I’ve worked in Petra for 20 years, and I knew that something was there, but it’s certainly legitimate to call this a discovery.”

 

The structure is supposed to be for ceremonial purposes and it was also revealed in the survey that there was a smaller platform inside the larger platform.

 

Petra was visited by hundreds of thousands of visitors each year but the recent conflict by the so-called Islamic State has resulted in the decrease of a substantial amount of visitors. ISIS has previously destroyed a number of archeological sites including tombs and resting places of prophets.
The most famous site in Petra is the treasury building which was showcased in the Indiana Jones and the last Crusade movie and is carved from sandstone.

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